Published On: Tue, Sep 14th, 2021

State pension age change means the ‘least well off are losing out’ | Personal Finance | Finance


Calls have been made for the Government to supply extra flexibility relating to state pension, to permit future retirees to take extra management over their post-working life preparations. There seems to be a starvation from pensioners to have extra choices accessible to them, with a couple of in three saying they might be curious about taking their pension early in the event that they had been allowed to take action.

Tom Selby, head of retirement coverage at AJ Bell stated that individuals residing in much less prosperous areas of the nation are finally losing out as a consequence of a scarcity of choices relating to when state pension may be taken. He stated: “Increases in the state pension age – particularly those that affected 1950s-born women – have been hugely controversial in recent years and sparked debate about the fairness of the current system.

“In particular, significant differences in life expectancy in different parts of the country have led to concerns the least well off are losing out. For example, according to official data someone born in Blackpool can expect to live, on average, a decade less than someone born in Westminster.”

“Allowing early state pension access at a reduced rate would potentially help address this unfairness. What’s more it could be popular, with more than a third of people aged 50 to 66, the current UK state pension age, saying they would consider this if it was offered as an option by the Government. Offering this option could also be cost neutral for the Treasury over the long-term.

“However, enabling early access would add extra complexity to the system and might result in people choosing to get their state pension as early as they can, without considering the impact on their retirement plans over the longer-term.

“This could also have implications for the Treasury, which would potentially face a short-term cashflow problem if lots of people decided to take their state pension before age 66.”

In the survey, 29.1 p.c of contributors stated that they weren’t certain whether or not they would take into account taking their state pension early, which maybe highlights a necessity for extra steering on points similar to this, as well as extra flexibility for individuals nearing retirement age.

Women Against State Pension Injustice (WASPI) have had well documented points with the Government because it pertains to state retirement age, as they argue {that a} lack of knowledge round the altering of the state pension age for ladies has led to many born in the 1950’s falling by means of the cracks.

The newest developments relating to pensioners in the UK, similar to the scrapping of the state pension triple lock for subsequent 12 months and older staff being roped in to the 1.25 p.c National Insurance hike, have prompted anger amongst older individuals in current weeks.

Those points mixed with knowledge from the impartial survey might encourage the notion that individuals trying to retire in the close to future want extra choices in order that they are capable of make the right choice for his or her state of affairs.

A Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) spokesperson instructed Express.co.uk: “Government dedicated in laws to undertake a assessment of state pension age each six years, to make sure that the state pension system protects present pensioners, and is reasonably priced, sustainable and truthful.

“Allowing early access to the state pension on a reduced basis could risk leaving people with an inadequate pension while a universal state pension age provides simplicity and clarity which helps people plan for their retirement.”



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